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The Kawaiisu Culture

Clothing and Adornments

Made from skins, pelts, bark and tule, clothing was simple and minimal. Breechcloths and two-piece skirts sufficed for the summer. Blankets and a poncho-like garment made of rabbit fur were worn in the winter. The men were responsible for making these blankets for their family group. Infants were wrapped in deer or rabbit skins. Shredded juniper bark or tule was used for diapers. Footwear was made of tanned deer hide. Pinyon pitch and ashes reinforced the soles of the shoes for long trips. Snowshoes were made of heavy twined cord and lined with pounded sagebrush bark.

Children's hair was burned short, while adults let their hair grow. Pierced ears and noses were usual among women. Tattoos were common for both men and women. Although women painted themselves often, men reserved painting for festive occasions and ceremonial use.

The Kawaiisu Culture
History
Language & Homeland
Contact with Others
Social Organization
Shelter
Diet
Food Preparation
Basketry
Tools and Implements
Clothing and Adornments
Recreation
Stories and Myths
Rock Art

Natural History
Geology
Weather

Related Pages


ecology: wildlife - plants - geography: places - MAPS - roads & trails: route 66 - old west - communities - weather - glossary
ghost towns - gold mines - parks & public lands: wilderness - native culture - history - geology: natural features - comments

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