Digital-Desert : Mojave Desert
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ecology: wildlife - plants - geography: places - MAPS - roads & trails: route 66 - old west - communities - weather - glossary
ghost towns - gold mines - parks & public lands: wilderness - native culture - history - geology: natural features - comments


San Bernardino County Mining History
Ivanpah
Later Mining History of the Mescal Range, Ivanpah Mountains and south Clark Mountain

Kewanee & Sunnyside Camps

During the summer of 1907, the east side of the Ivanpah Mountains were alive with mining activity. Perhaps a dozen mines were being worked, and two small camps sprang up. At the Casa Grande Mine, a place called Meadsville was established after the discoverers Dr. J.S. Mead and his son. Then, Robert Williams discovered gold-silver-lead ore north and slightly west of the Casa Grande mine, and about one-half mile west of the Morning Star (at that time known as the Clansman). William's named his discovery the Sunnyside mine, and Sunnyside Camp was soon established. A correspondent for the newly established Barstow Printer reported the comings and goings of the families.

By summer 1908, the Meads' discovery had been renamed the Kewanee Mine, and the camp, Kewanee Camp. Between 1907 and 1911, Dr. Mead and the Kewanee Gold Mining Company ambitiously developed the property, hiring 50 miners, and installing a mill. The small quartz veins were richly mineralized with gold. An unsuccessful attempt was made in 1952 to reopen the mine.

The Sunnyside Mine was intermittently active until 1912 when the Los Angeles based Palm Hill Mining Company sank a shaft, installed a hoist, and constructed new buildings. In 1913 a mill was planned. But apparently never constructed.
ecology: wildlife - plants - geography: places - MAPS - roads & trails: route 66 - old west - communities - weather - glossary
ghost towns - gold mines - parks & public lands: wilderness - native culture - history - geology: natural features - comments

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1952