Digital-Desert : Mojave Desert
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nature: Geology, Wildlife & Plants -- geography: Maps - Regions - Points of Interest - Communities -- roads & trails: Route 66 -- glossary
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Mining History: Desert Fever

Kern County:

MOJAVE DISTRICT

Coming in a close second to the Yellow Aster, the Golden Queen Mine Group on Soledad Mountain is the Mojave Mining District's brightest star. With an overall gold production of $10,000,000, the Golden Queen Mine Group (with the Yellow Aster) are jointly responsible for almost half the gold output for the entire county since 1880.

This district, although discovered a year before Randsburg, never really received much attention in it's early years. It wasn't until the depression years of the 1930s that the Mojave District was finally able to wrestle the spotlight away from Randsburg by producing more than $12,000,000 in gold and silver from 1932-1 942. Limitation Order L-208 severely affected this district, shutting its mines down almost overnight. Never able to recover from the rapid closures, The Mojave District's post war production was less than one-tenth that of it's pre-war days.

Standard Hill
Five hills or mountains lie within the Mojave District, four of which contain a quantity of mineral wealth. The first of these is Standard Hill, where George Bowers made the first discovery of rich gold float in 1894, developing ...

Soledad Mountain
On Soledad Mountain, richest of the four mineral-bearing mountains, the Queen Esther and Echo mines were originally located during the excitement created by George Bowers in 1894. The Queen Esther ore was ...

Middle Butte
Besides Standard Hill and Soledad Mountain, gold and silver production also came from Middle Butte. The Middle Butte Mine was worked by Walter Trent in 1935 after the Burton brothers found rich outcroppings ...

Tropico Hill
The fourth area of production in the Mojave District was Tropico Hill. In the late 1870s, a Dr. L. A. Crandall noticed a red coloration on a hill near Willow Springs. Taking some samples, he found it to be suitable as ...



nature: Geology, Wildlife & Plants -- geography: Maps - Regions - Points of Interest - Communities -- roads & trails: Route 66 -- glossary
Parks & Public Lands: Wilderness -- Native Culture - history: Pioneers - Military - Ghost Towns & Gold Mines - Mining - Old West -- comments
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